Avoiding Student Loan Debt, Educational Consulting, Majors and Areas of Study, Understanding the Market

Understanding College Advising

If you’re a student, you probably have a number of people advising you: teachers, guidance counselors, college admissions people, your parents… the list could go on. I’d like to help students understand what advising — and educational consulting — can and can’t do for you.

All advisors should listen to the student’s own long and short term goals, and they should ask leading questions to help the student clarify them. They should recommend a variety of paths to the student to reach those goals, but be honest, informed, and realistic about these different paths. Advisors should also provide materials to the student to help the student make better informed decisions, and they should engage in advising with the student’s best interests in mind.

But a good advisor won’t feel obligated to validate all of the student’s goals or ideas. If a student is really committed to humanities Ph.D. study or law school, for example, the advisor should still inform the student of the realities of these programs of study, not tell the student what he or she wants to hear. Being honest about the realities of a path may be discouraging to the student, but the student still needs that information to make an informed decision.

A good advisor will also be honest about the student’s demonstrated abilities so far in their educational careers. If a student’s grades are weak in math, science, or English, a good advisor will be honest with the student about the barriers those grades might present. However, a good advisor will also know that a student’s grades do not define the student as a person or necessarily summarize their potential. In other words, good advisors know that not all barriers are insurmountable.

A good advisor won’t do anything other than advising: good advisors give students facts about the field, the market, and educational options, but they don’t try to make students’ decisions for them. They also don’t give students advice intended to benefit the student’s educational institution above the student. Every B.A. program would love to say 90% of their graduates were accepted for Ph.D. study, but that doesn’t mean that 90% of their graduates should be pursuing Ph.D. study. Good advising, in other words, is never anything other than a supplement to the student’s own decision-making process. It is not supposed to or be able to take the place of the student’s own decision making.

If you’re a student, you should know that your decisions are ultimately your own. You make them and then you live with the consequences. Because these are ultimately your decisions, you should be aggressive in pursuing information that will help you make the most informed decisions possible. Get everything that you can from your advisor and then seek out other information as well. Listen to your advisors, even if you disagree with them, rather than demand to be told certain things. And, listen to a number of advisors. Don’t get your information only from one source.

You should also think generally about what you most want. Do you mainly want to make a living? Or do you mainly want to perform fulfilling work? Are you willing to make a bit less money to be more fulfilled in the kind of work that you do?

There are no right answers to these questions. Some people pursue work in high-paying fields and then burn out and make expensive mid-career shifts to more fulfilling fields. Some people pursue fulfillment but have a hard time making a decent living. Ideally, of course, we would all work in fulfilling jobs that pay well, whether we work as employees, own our own businesses, or do creative, freelance work.

We all also need to understand that the ability to do work that is both fulfilling and very profitable is dependent upon many arbitrary factors. At the least, it is dependent upon the random intersections of what this society chooses to reward financially, your own abilities, and your own interests. Just don’t mistake profitability for inherent value: scientific or engineering work generates patents and/or high end products (like bridges, tanks, and computers), so produces a lot of money, and there aren’t enough people around with math skills at that high a level, so the employee pool is small.

Someone who produces something that can be packaged and sold at high volume can also make a lot of money: one hit single can pay a lot. But while small employee pools, high end products, and mass produced products drive up the profitability of a line of work, an engineer or singer is not inherently more valuable, socially, than a middle school math or music teacher. You can’t have engineers and singers without math and music teachers. If we lost every pro basketball player in the world, the world wouldn’t be that bad off–maybe it’d even be better off in some ways. But if we lost all of our music and math teachers, that would be a long term disaster for the human race.

What might that ideal spot of wage earning and job fulfillment look like for you? No advisor can answer that question. No one can tell you what you want. Advising can only point you in a direction that leads you to your goals, so no advising will be better than your own knowledge of your own goals. Bright Futures Educational Consulting is here to help you define your goals first, and once you’ve done that, it will show you the best paths to help you meet them. Contact us for more information.

Avoiding Student Loan Debt, Educational Consulting, Majors and Areas of Study, Understanding the Market

Going to Major in Education?

If you’re thinking about majoring in Education (to teach K-12), here’s what you need to know:

  1. You may be used to hearing much worse numbers, but about 17% of teachers are no longer teaching after five years. About 10% quit after the first year.
  2. Teaching is a more than full time profession, and many, if not most, teachers don’t really have the summer off. The typical work day is around 12-16 hours for many teachers, although that varies within semesters. Don’t go into teaching if you want easy work. You don’t get overtime pay.
  3. The highest paying states in 2016-17 were New York ($81,902), California ($79,128), and Massachusetts ($78,100), with Mississippi ($42,925), Oklahoma ($45,292) and West Virginia ($45,555) paying the least. You might note how these numbers will inflate average teacher salaries nationally, as two of the highest paying states are also the most populated states. Follow the link above to get information about your state.
  4. Teachers across the country generally feel disrespected. If you’re thinking about teaching, you’re in it for your students, and those who manage to keep teaching do so because they keep their eye on that prize. Speaking as someone who chaired a Master’s degree program with a lot of teachers, I can vouch for this myself.
  5. K-6 teaching is more manageable in terms of disciplinary action than middle school or high school, depending upon area, so keep that in mind.
  6. If you’re thinking about High School teaching, in many schools that’s almost a double major, as you need both education and subject matter training. Check out the Bureau of Labor Statistics for more information about high school teaching as a profession.

My advice for people thinking about teaching?

  • First, get a sense of being in a classroom as a teacher through internships no later than your junior year if at all possible. That’s when you’ll want to change majors if you change your mind. Some students do.
  • Next, no matter where you teach, income will be relatively low compared to cost of living. That means avoid getting your education degrees at expensive, private colleges. Attend much lower tuition public colleges and avoid debt as much as possible.
  • Finally, if you’re really called to teach, nothing else will quite satisfy. Don’t let the information above discourage you. But go into it with your eyes open, and research the best districts in your state wherever you may work. Definitely attend college in the state in which you want to work.

Bright Futures Educational Consulting can help you think through your degree choices and options even after your degree. Give us a call.