Avoiding Student Loan Debt, Cost of Degree, Educational Consulting, Understanding the Market

How Does Our Service Work?

If you’re a high school student, a college student thinking about transferring, a college student thinking about graduate school, or a parent of any one of these, Bright Futures Educational Consulting can help you or your child choose a major and then a college that will give you the best employment prospects with the least debt. That’s our goal.

And, we can do it for students anywhere in the world for a relatively low price.

No matter where you are, you start out with either a telephone or an internet chat. This one hour initial consultation is free. After that, if you choose to retain our services, after you make payment you’ll be sent a link to our proprietary online questionnaire. As part of the questionnaire, you’ll upload a copy of your most recent unofficial transcripts. The questionnaire and transcripts will allow us to make an assessment of your strongest interests, your secondary interests, and then your strengths and weaknesses. It really covers everything.

After we’ve done this assessment, we’ll generate a customized report spelling out your best options for higher education, from choosing a major to choosing a college, along with an analysis of the possible return on your investment for your different degree options.

From there, we start working together — on your application essay, your request for letters of recommendation and, if needed, your financial aid and scholarship applications. Then, you start applying.

Even if you think you’re a weak student with limited options, we can find options for you that you didn’t think you had. Once you’ve started applying, we’ll be with you to advise you and help you all the way until you start college, even up to the point of making sure you’re in touch with the right people at your new institution.

The services you receive are customized — you can save money by only getting help in the areas that you most need it. After that, our consulting service has two tiers. First, in-person and direct, and next, online only. In-person consulting is higher depending upon travel costs. We’re located on Florida’s Space Coast, so anywhere from St. Augustine, FL to Jupiter, FL along Florida’s east coast and then into the Orlando area is our lowest price. Outside that radius, prices go up a bit.

If you’d like to keep costs low, though, you can choose our online only consulting. Since all of our initial consulting and the questionnaire is online, we can conduct all follow up meetings online, and we can send you copies of your consulting report by both email and paper mail.

It’s probably best if you think of our service as an investment that’s bound to save you money — thousands of dollars in student loans, wasted time at the wrong institutions or pursuing the wrong majors, and a lot of stress dealing with the unknowns involved in applying to college. Give us a call and see how we can help you in your specific situation. Check out these other links for more information:

Avoiding Student Loan Debt, Cost of Degree, Graduation Rates, Learning, Majors and Areas of Study, Return on Investment, Understanding the Market

Revisiting “An Era of Neglect”

In 2014 the Chronicle of Higher Education ran a lengthy article about higher education funding titled “An Era of Neglect.” The number of candidates proposing reforms in higher education funding this election cycle has made student debt, education funding, and education costs hot topics again, so I think now is a good time to revisit these reports.

In short, between 2008 and 2014 economic downturns and private sector commitments to paying as few taxes as possible has led to cuts in state budgets. Rises in tuition costs during this period were exactly proportional in many cases to cuts in state budgets for education, and in order to drive up admissions, colleges are increasingly investing in sports and amenities rather than in qualified educators.

The result is that the business sector is getting what they’re paying for in the form of lesser-skilled college grads, the costs of college are being increasingly pushed onto the public in the form of debt, and a new debt crisis is looming as college graduates are increasingly unemployable or underemployed, making it difficult to repay these student loans.

While colleges and universities can be more responsible in their spending patterns, that by itself isn’t enough to reverse this situation.

You might think it’s smart to just skip college altogether, but with few exceptions, bad prospects for college grads mean worse ones for those without a college education.

The only winner in this situation is the financial sector, at the expense of taxpayers.

An Era of Neglect – Special Reports – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Cost of Degree, Educational Consulting, Majors and Areas of Study, Pedagogy, Understanding the Market

Podcast: James Rovira and the Anazoa Educational Project on Punkonomics

I’ve blogged quite a bit about a number of higher education topics, but what’s my own vision for higher education? I spent some time with Dr. Beni Balak, Professor of Economics at Rollins College, on the phone for his Punkonomics podcast to discuss the Anazoa Educational Project and my vision for higher education. Follow the link to listen to the podcast.

Avoiding Student Loan Debt, Cost of Degree, Understanding the Market

How We Used to Fund College

A number of presidential candidates are floating the idea of “tuition-free college.” I’d like to put that into historical context.

My father, who is in his 80s, only had to pay $9.00 a term to attend college at CCNY back in his day. He could easily pay that out of pocket with his part time job. In today’s dollars, that would be equivalent to paying about $90 for a full semester of coursework, or four or five classes. Not $90 per class, but $90 per semester, or about $18-$22 per class.

Do you really think that $9.00/term tuition covered the cost of running the college? Of course not. It was that cheap because the City of New York was funding it.

So when Bernie Sanders says he wants “tuition free” college, he’s just trying to set up the same system his generation had when it went to college. The same system that existed through the 40s, 50s, 60s, and the 70s most places. It’s not about getting free stuff, or not pulling your weight, but about setting up a system that actually works, like the system we had back in the 50s.

Why did the City of New York end tuition free college? Not because it couldn’t afford it. It was a political move. According to The University Against Itself (Temple UP, 2008), New York University, an expensive private institution in New York City, lobbied with city government to end state tuition so that it could be more competitive for students. The issue wasn’t financial, or that the system wasn’t working, or that New York City residents didn’t like it. It was purely political, and the politicians working now to reverse this situation are sensibly trying to work a political fix for a problem that was political to begin with.

If you graduated before college in 2008, you had a lower debt to income ratio than any college student afterwards did. If you graduated college before 1990, it was much, much lower. It’s not just about “individual responsibility” when a predatory system has been set up to trap people doing something they need to live.

Educational Consulting, Learning, Majors and Areas of Study, Return on Investment, Understanding the Market

Podcast: Are College Students Being Prepared for the Workforce?

Have you enjoyed my blogging about workforce preparation and college education? If you like listening to podcasts, I was interviewed by Tim Muma about that topic on LJN Radio.